BugHuntress story

My impessions of working as QA Engineer

BugHuntress storyMy “career” of QA engineer started with Web projects where I tested promo sites and online shops. With such projects I immediately familiarized with cross-browser and cross-platform testing. While I was absolutely comfortable with cross-browser testing, I had no idea of the way cross-platform testing must be carried out. I had a crazy idea that several Windows versions could have been installed on my PC so that I could switch between them but it appeared otherwise. I was given the access to virtual machines VMware vSphere on which the needed Windows\Mac OS had been already installed. It remained for me to learn to do snapshots and install necessary browsers. As the first step is always troublesome, I made the right snapshot series at the fifth try. At the time I also learnt more about iOS and Android on tablets and smartphones. Also, familiarized with Clip2net and afterwards with Jing which I liked more and use it till today.

As I am usually meticulous and thorough I tried to do clear and easily understandable snapshots so that the person who sees them for the first time had no questions about what exactly I’m trying to say.  And I have never heard somebody cannot make sense of my screenshot, quite the opposite, I was thanked a couple of times for comprehensible and easy screenshots.

I liked to watch the site developing from nothing to what the client wants it to be. And I like to take part in this process.  Working at these projects I also experienced Drupal. I tested CMS and it was exciting to create content and fulfill the site with information and images. It took some time to understand what’s what but it was not a difficult thing using Chrome development tool and Firebug for Mozilla FireFox.

Hereupon I got to Android apps development and had a closer look at this OS. I had to install and learn to use SDK Manager. We worked with tablets and I had to send logs to programmers, therefore, I get acquainted with Java developers and Java language itself. I knew about popular languages before but it was the first time I met it “face to face”. Sometimes I just watched the parts of the code being changed by programmers in order to fix the bug. Working at this project I discovered regression testing. Probably the thing I was really tired of was permanent regression. We had not one or two builds’ releases a day but up to ten. And the regression testing not being finished had to start all over again.

At the same time I tried to learn something about test automation thinking it would be wonderful to make the regression simply run under my command. It raised my interest to automation and stimulated to read forums, articles, watch video lessons etc. And now from time to time I am trying to set aside some time to read something related to this sphere. That is why I started using Selenium and Eclipse. Afterwards I got to the project with automation and while manual testing I learned java and tried myself at writing small tasks in Eclipse. I really liked it but Java appeared to be not so simple and was hard for me to comprehend, especially taking to consideration that up to the point my knowledge came down to just HTML. Not meeting the deadline I had to stop my efforts to learn the needed things. But I’m glad I’ve tried. And I’ll be trying in future as it is exciting to see how your code works and how everything happens automatically in browser without your help.

However then I did several automated tests in Selenium IDE and got into the spirit even more! It is really interesting and very useful in certain cases when you can reduce the testing time of the same features significantly.

Upon the whole, I feel great working in QA department and I’m eagerly anxious to progress in this sphere. Automation is tired of waiting for me! The feeling of being a part of creating a high-quality product is priceless and it inspires to move on!


About Alexander G.

I have worked in IT for a year. I have a passion for regression testing, testing in agile projects and, above all, continuous learning from different perspectives.


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